Oxford Motorcars

1971 Porsche 911E Coupe

  • 1971 Porsche 911E Coupe

Oxford Motorcars

1971 Porsche 911E Coupe

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Description

Introduced in 1968 and built up until 1973, the 911T, T standing for touring, was the entry level 911 from Porsche. 1972 was the first year of the 2.4 Liter engine across the 911 range, also new in 1972 specifically for the 911T was the introduction of mechanical fuel injection, which bumped the power up to 140 HP. 1972 was also the only year of the oil filler being exposed on the passenger quarter panel. This is a true two-owner car; the current owner has been in possession of the car for over 30 years and he personally knew the original owner. It has been garaged it's whole life, but the paint on this particular example is still over 40 years old; it appears dull in some areas, has chips and cracks throughout the body, as well as some checking. There is a small amount of rust around the rear window frame on the driver side quarter panel. The Targa bar is in very respectable shape, the rest of the exterior brightwork isn't in as great shape, with most pieces have some pitting, surface scratches or cloudiness, or a combination of the three. The seats are in surprisingly good shape, having just one small tear in the driver seat side bolster. The rest of the interior is in decent shape for the age of the vehicle, but still not without flaws. The dash has a crack in it, there is a crack in the driver side door card, and the bottom sections of the door card on both sides has been removed, and have been stored in the trunk space. Structurally the 911 is very sound, with no rot but some very minor surface rust. Mechanically the transmission shifts smoothly, however the motor should have the tensioner upgrade completed, as it sounds like there may be some noise coming from that area. The motor has never been apart to our knowledge and would definitely benefit from a refresh, although the car is currently in driveable condition. If it were us, we would rebuild the original motor, sell the one in the car to help fund the rebuild, and finish up with a reliable running, driving car with a known pedigree. If interested, we will include the numbers-matching motor which has been disassembled for ease of transport. The Targa roof is in decent shape, with a small break at one joint that does not affect its functionality. The alloy wheels (5, including the spare) have their fair share of blemishes and imperfections but have no faults to our knowledge other than the cosmetics. As it sits currently it is a running and driving barn find. Overall, this is an extremely solid foundation for a complete restoration, or just dealing with the motor and driving it as is.

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